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Frequently Asked Questions

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Visit the Report a Crime section of the U.S. Department of Justice website to learn how you can report child pornography or cases involving the sexual exploitation of children.

You can also report suspicion of child sexual exploitation to your local police, your ICAC Task Force or the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children's CyberTipline (www.cybertipline.com or 1–800–843–5678).

Information on police response to victims with disabilities is available in the OVC Victims with Disabilities: Collaborative, Multidisciplinary First Response (DVD and Guidebook). For additional information, visit the Victims with Disabilities section of our website.

The number of sexual assaults that occur in the U.S. is available in Criminal Victimization in the United States: Statistical Tables from the Bureau of Justice Statistics. The annual Crime in the United States report, published by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, provides data on rape reported to the police.

For additional information about sexual assault, visit the Sexual Assault section of our website.

College-specific crime statistics can be found on the Campus Security Data Analysis Cutting Tool website from the U.S. Department of Education Office for Postsecondary Education.

Additional data and information can be found on the U.S. Department of Education's Campus Security page.

Crime in the United States, an annual report from the Federal Bureau of Investigation, provides university/college campus crime data that are reported by law enforcement.

Learn more about campus crime and serving victims of crime on the Campus Crime section of our website.

The most recent tally of Americans killed as a result of terrorist attacks can be found in the U.S. Department of State annual Country Reports on Terrorism. Visit the Crime: Terrorism section of the National Criminal Justice Reference Service (NCJRS) website for additional information.

Many OVC publications and products are available in hardcopy and can be ordered from the National Criminal Justice Reference Service (NCJRS), OVC's information clearinghouse. You can search for and order available OVC resources via the NCJRS Publications/Products page. While these resources are free, shipping and handling fees may apply. View the Shopping Cart Help at NCJRS for more information.

Visit our Help for Victims microsite to learn about resources and services for victims of crime. Assistance may come in the form of financial reimbursement or victim services. Funding support for state assistance and compensation programs comes from the Crime Victims Fund administered by the OVC as authorized by the Victim of Crime Act.

Another source of help is your local victim/witness assistance program. You may contact the VictimConnect helpline by phone at 855–484–2846 or online chat for a referral in your area.

Find out more in this brochure, What You Can Do If You Are a Victim of Crime, which includes a brief overview of OVC, your rights, and where you can get help.

Visit our International Terrorism to learn about programs that provide funding and assistance to victims in the aftermath of a terrorism event outside the United States.

According to 2019 data, the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children assisted law enforcement in 29,000 cases of missing children and less than 1 percent of those cases were nonfamily abductions.

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