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Victimization of children and youth

There's More to Me

Summary

There’s More To Me is a graphic novel that tells the stories of five different youth—Alex, Jamal, Jesse, Amy, and Ari. Each character has their own experience as a victim or witness in a criminal case.

Brave Oscar

Summary

Brave Oscar tells the story of what happens to a little boy named Oscar after his father is arrested.

Human Trafficking: A Guide for Practitioners

A Guide for Practitioners

These materials were designed for youth aged 12−18 who have experienced sex and labor trafficking, to help inform and empower them as they navigate through the justice system.

Funded by the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC), these materials were created with the input of those with similar lived experiences, and expert practitioners working in the anti-trafficking field.

I Am Isabella

Summary

I Am Isabella tells the story of what happens to a young girl named Isabella after a caseworker visits her home.

To illustrate common occurrences in child welfare cases, the story follows Isabella as she meets a caseworker, talks to a counselor at school, goes to court and meets her advocate, and builds a network of support to understand and process her experience.

Acknowledgements

Acknowledgements

The Center for Court Innovation’s Child Witness Materials Project is a collaborative effort between the Center for Court Innovation and the Center for Urban Pedagogy, and is supported by cooperative agreement #2016-VF-GX-K011, awarded by the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Office for Victims of Crime.

Who's That? In Family or Dependency Court

Summary

Who’s That? In Family or Dependency Court—a complementary piece to It’s Not Just You—is a brief guide that explains the different roles of people that a teenager may interact with or hear about throughout their child welfare case and in family or dependency court. It includes practical tips for preparing for court and information on some rights to which children are entitled.

What Is Your Job? In Criminal Court

Summary

What Is Your Job? In Criminal Court—a companion piece to Brave Oscar—is a picture book that explains the different roles of people that a child may interact with or hear about throughout a criminal case and in criminal court. It includes information on the role of the child in court and an illustration of a courtroom.

Human Trafficking: A Guide for Parents and Caregivers

A Guide for Parents and Caregivers

These materials were designed for youth aged 12−18 who have experienced sex and labor trafficking, to help inform and empower them as they navigate through the justice system.

They were created with the input of those with similar lived experiences, and expert practitioners working in the anti-trafficking field.

I Am Still Isabella

Summary

I Am Still Isabella tells the story of what happens to Isabella after she is removed from her home and placed with another caregiver, her auntie.

To illustrate common occurrences in cases of child removal, the story follows Isabella as she adjusts to life in her new home, regularly meets with her caseworker and counselor and discusses her feelings about what is happening, and visits with her mother.

Who's That? In Criminal Court

Summary

Who’s That? In Criminal Court—a complementary piece to There’s More to Me—is a brief guide that explains the different roles of people that youth may interact with or hear about throughout their criminal case and in criminal court. It includes practical tips for preparing for court and information on some rights to which children are entitled.

Sergio's Story: A Journey Through (and Beyond) the Legal System

Summary

Sergio’s Story describes the experience of a young boy who was a victim of labor trafficking and is part of a federal case.  

The story follows Sergio as he shares his experiences with a trusted adult, meets with a victim advocate in the prosecutor’s office who supported him as he navigated the criminal legal system, and receives support from family and a caseworker.